Landmarks and Important Buildings

More than two dozen buildings and sites, including mansions, industrial buildings, Motor Row showrooms, and more, can be seen by walking through the area.

Prairie Avenue

Glessner House front door1800 S. Prairie Avenue
1886-1887, Henry Hobson Richardson, architect
This National Historic Landmark contains many of the original furnishings of John and Frances Glessner, proponents of the emerging Arts & Crafts movement in the late 19th century.

Kimball House1801 S. Prairie Avenue
1890-1892, Solon S. Beman, architect
This imposing Chateauesque-style home with elaborate stone trim and mansard roof was built for the owner of the Kimball Piano & Organ Company.

Coleman House1811 S. Prairie Avenue
1886, Cobb & Frost, architects
The brown sandstone residence built for the owner of a hardware company now serves, along with the Kimball House, as the headquarters of the U.S. Soccer Federation.

Chicago Women's Park and Gardens1800 block of Prairie and Indiana Avenues
Opened 2000
Designed by Chicago landscape architect Mimi McKay, this park was created to pay tribute to important woman in the history of Chicago.

Harriet Rees House2017 S. Prairie Avenue
1888, Cobb & Frost, architects
This narrow row house features beautifully executed stone detailing in the steeply pitched gable, around the third floor arcade and on the rounded bay window.

Keith House1900 S. Prairie Avenue
1870, John W. Roberts, architect
The last surviving example of the popular Second Empire style on Prairie Avenue, this was one of several homes occupied by members of the Keith family on the street.

Marshall Field Jr mansion1919 S. Prairie Avenue
1884, Solon S. Beman, architect
1902, D. H. Burnham & Co., architect
This house was enlarged several times throughout its history and was extensively restored in the early 2000s after sitting largely vacant for twenty-five years.

Reid House2013 S. Prairie Avenue
1894, Beers, Clay & Dutton, architects
The only house on Prairie Avenue to remain a single-family home throughout its history features a large Palladian window marking the location of the third-floor ballroom.

ComEd substation1620 S. Prairie Avenue
1925, Hermann V. von Holst, architect
Housing equipment used to convert raw power into DC current for the nearby Metra line, the building features attractive polychrome terra cotta and limestone relief panels.

Calumet Avenue

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Cullerton Street

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Indiana Avenue

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21st Street

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Cermak Avenue

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Michigan Avenue

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Open Items and To Dos:

  • PDNA to revise/expand intro text (can still be brief). Add bulleted list for areas? Add image to section?
  • PDNA to review and revise other text as needed.
  • Should areas and landmarks be listed in a specific order (alpha, location)?
  • Need to complete adding images and text to remaining sections, from current site.